Why are there different medicines for when one is in a manic or depressive state as opposed to when not in one?

There is a pretty generic answer to your question, and honestly the generic answers are somehow I doubt what you are looking for. But here goes. There are multiple states one could be in, and different medications help with different states… depressed, anxious, elevated, mixed, mania, etc. The reason behind this all points to neurotransmitters (basically serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine) and each medication effects them differently.
Rather than attempt to put all the information again (and honestly so that I don’t cause any confusion) the link to the DBSA site about medications will be at the end of this writing.
There are:
Anti-depressants: the name pretty much says it all… and there are [at least] 7 classes of them based on how they work
– definitely take a look at the link below… there is a lot more to anti-depressants than most of us think
Anti-psychotics: Of all the names, I like this one the least… taking them doesn’t imply the patient is psychotic, but that is what the class of medications used to be used for [exclusively]. There are both typical (older; thorazine, navane, etc) and atypical (newer; Zyprexa, Geodon, Seroquel, etc) in this class. Of note, however, is that sometimes the newer atypical anti-psychotics are not even called ‘anti-psychotics’ due to the bad connotation.
– these typically act on dopamine primarily…
Anti-convulsants: Essentially also called ‘anti-seizure’ medications. There is the notion that essentially speaking mania could be likened to a lightning storm of activity in the brain… each cell signaling the next to fire, etc… anti-convulsants increase the amount of energy needed for the cells to fire… essentially ‘quieting the storm’… helping people stay stable, once they are there.
– Lamictal, for example, has helped me tremendously… and while I cant recall all that it acts on, it helps me with stability and even depression
The full Medication Information Sheet on the DBSA…
http://bit.ly/gBMgWZ
I hope this all helps… I’m trying to ride a fine line of helping with the information and not wanting to get anything inaccurate on this important topic.

Why are there different medicines for when one is in a manic or depressive state as opposed to when not in one?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There is a pretty generic answer to your question, and honestly the generic answers are somehow I doubt what you are looking for. But here goes. There are multiple states one could be in, and different medications help with different states… depressed, anxious, elevated, mixed, mania, etc. The reason behind this all points to neurotransmitters (basically serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine) and each medication effects them differently.

Rather than attempt to put all the information again (and honestly so that I don’t cause any confusion) the link to the DBSA site about medications will be at the end of this writing.

There are:

Anti-depressants: the name pretty much says it all… and there are [at least] 7 classes of them based on how they work
– definitely take a look at the link below… there is a lot more to anti-depressants than most of us think

Anti-psychotics: Of all the names, I like this one the least… taking them doesn’t imply the patient is psychotic, but that is what the class of medications used to be used for [exclusively]. There are both typical (older; thorazine, navane, etc) and atypical (newer; Zyprexa, Geodon, Seroquel, etc) in this class. Of note, however, is that sometimes the newer atypical anti-psychotics are not even called ‘anti-psychotics’ due to the bad connotation.
– these typically act on dopamine primarily…

Anti-convulsants: Essentially also called ‘anti-seizure’ medications. There is the notion that essentially speaking mania could be likened to a lightning storm of activity in the brain… each cell signaling the next to fire, etc… anti-convulsants increase the amount of energy needed for the cells to fire… essentially ‘quieting the storm’… helping people stay stable, once they are there.
– Lamictal, for example, has helped me tremendously… and while I cant recall all that it acts on, it helps me with stability and even depression

The full Medication Information Sheet on the DBSA…
http://bit.ly/gBMgWZ

I hope this all helps… I’m trying to ride a fine line of helping with the information and not wanting to get anything inaccurate on this important topic.

Thoughts? Questions? Leave your feedback here!